U.S. Housing -: No Recovery ? – A Subsidized Bounce

Wipe our Debt

Wipe our Debt (Photo credit: Images_of_Money)

October 21

Instead of actual responsible behavior of paying down debt, the primary if not only reason there has been any “deleveraging” at all at the US household level, is because of excess debt which became insurmountable, not because it was being paid down, the result of which is that more and more Americans are simply handing their keys in to the bank and walking away, and also explains why the US banking system is now practicing Foreclosure Stuffing, as defined first here, as the banks know too well, if all the housing inventory which is currently in the default pipeline were unleashed, it would rip off any floor below the US housing “recovery” which is not a recovery at all, but merely a subsidized bounce, as millions of units are held on the banks’ books in hopes that what limited inventory there is gets bid up so high the second housing bubble can be inflated before the first one has even fully burst.

hyperinflation

The Automatic Earth

Naturally, two concurrent housing bubbles can not happen, Bernanke‘s fondest wishes to the contrary notwithstanding, especially since as shown above, US households do not delever unless they actually file for bankruptcy, and in the process destroy their credit rating for years, making them ineligible for future debt for at least five years.

It is thus safe to say that all the other increasingly poorer US households [..] are merely adding on more and more debt in hopes of going out in a bankrupt blaze of glory just like everyone else: from their neighbors, to all “developed world” governments. And why not: after all this behavior is being endorsed by the Fed with both hands and feet.

The following graph from TD Securities ( through Sam Ro at BI ) makes a good case for the “subsidized bounce” definition Durden applies to the present US housing market. It’s no secret there’s a huge shadow inventory overhanging US housing, and now it comes out that those great new home numbers are not what everybody would like to think they are.

hyperinflation

The Automatic Earth

Many more houses are built than sold. And get shoved on top of the pile that’s already there, both the shadow inventory and the out of the closet one. Which begs the question: how long does a home stay in the “new” category? Does it take 1 year of staying empty for it to move to “existing”? 2 years, 3 years? 5? For one thing, builders and developers certainly have a huge incentive to continue to advertise it as new.

A graph from the same source:

hyperinflation

The Automatic Earth

How this constitutes a recovery I just can’t fathom. I think that is just something people would like so much to see that they actually see it. Moreover, there remains the issue that it’s very hard for most to comprehend what debt deflation is, what its dynamics are, and what consequences it has.

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