Trading Alerts : Sell Side Success August 5 a.m.

Happy And Satisfied Guy Holding Up A Bunch Of Money 1

 

Chesapeake ( CHK) $7.27 down .68

Linn Energy ( LINN)  $3.13 down .31

On Deck ( ONDK)  $9.75 down .72

Lumber Liquidators ( LL) $1375 down $4.61

 

Portfolio Management : Engagement Process for Jack A. Bass Managed Accounts

The Engagement Agreement authorizes us to officially act on your  behalf and also provides for protection of confidentiality in regards to the dissemination and distribution of your sensitive financial information.Generally you will name Jack A. Bass as a person allowed to trade your portfolio – BUT without any authority to remove funds from your account.You retain full control.

Due Diligence. Once our company is engaged, we undertake the required due diligence to confirm and verify the necessary information required to execute your request.

Evaluation. After due diligence we evaluate your company’s current value and estimate future value based on recent market and other comparable data.

Fees. Engagement Fees are  NOT based on the number of hours and direct costs required to complete due diligence, perform an evaluation, and prepare the necessary information to support your request that we act for you.Our initial review ; also includes performing financial analysis, conduct competitive comparisons, in- depth financial reviews, and validating the necessary information to prepare the most compelling portfolio related to your needs.

We earn our fees by performance :

1 % per year as administration

20 % of annual portfolio gains calculated twice a year

There is no cost or obligation to contact us

 

Email  info@jackbassteam.com

all email replied to within 24 hours

or

 call Jack direct at 604-858-3202

Pacific Time Zone – same time zone as Los Angeles

Main website http://www.jackbassteam.com

http://www.youroffshoremoney.com

Corporate stock buybacks put a floor under earnings ? Bloomberg

Wall Street analysts are gloomy about corporate performance in the second quarter, predicting that profits fell 6.5 percent. If companies weren’t buying so much of their own stock, the drop could be much worse: 9 percent. “It makes you rethink a lot of things,” says Kevin Mahn, president of Hennion & Walsh Asset Management. “We question how much earnings growth has taken place because of actual sales growth and consumer spending—and how much is attributable to buybacks.”

Corporations report profits as earnings per share (EPS). By reducing the number of shares outstanding, buybacks help increase a company’s EPS. The impact of buybacks was harder to see in the first three years of the bull market, when ballooning profit margins helped companies in the Standard & Poor’s 500-stock index almost double their earnings. Now that margin growth has flattened out, buybacks’ contribution is more significant. Companies in the S&P 500 bought more than $550 billion of their own stock last year, boosting EPS growth by 2.3 percentage points, according to data compiled by Bloomberg.

The last time buybacks contributed as much to profits was in 2007, when companies spent the most ever on their own stock and enhanced that year’s increase in EPS by 3.1 percentage points. “Today the argument is buybacks are distorting the market, but I’m less certain,” says Dan Greenhaus, chief global strategist at BTIG, which provides trading services to institutional investors. “To the extent companies have thought their shares are undervalued the past few years, buybacks have been a fair use.”

Buyback announcements so far in 2015 have already topped full-year totals for 2008, 2009, 2010, and 2012, and they’re on pace to reach an annual record of $993 billion, according to Birinyi Associates. AIG announced a $3.5 billion share repurchase plan in April, and in June, Wendy’s said it would buy $1.4 billion of its stock.

Some companies borrow money for share purchases. Over the three months through June 19, companies in the S&P 500 listed buybacks or dividends among the uses for $58 billion they raised in bond sales, according to data compiled by Bloomberg and Sundial Capital Research.

Since 2009 companies have spent $2.4 trillion on buybacks, drawing criticism from politicians who say the companies should use the money to hire workers, pay them more, build plants, and fund research. In her economic policy speech on July 13, Hillary Clinton vowed to “propose reforms to help CEOs and shareholders alike focus on the next decade rather than just the next day, making sure stock buybacks aren’t being used only for an immediate boost in share prices.” Senators Tammy Baldwin (D-Wis.) and Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) have asked the Securities and Exchange Commission to look into the practice, with Warren saying that buybacks “create a sugar high for the corporations.”

Wall Street has its own doubts about the tactic. Investing in people, facilities, and research arguably could have a much bigger long-term impact on a company’s bottom line—not to mention the entire economy—than a company taking advantage of low interest rates to borrow money to buy its own stock. That’s the reasoning behind a letter BlackRock Chief Executive Officer Laurence Fink sent in April to the CEOs of S&P 500 companies, arguing that their “duty of care and loyalty” should be to long-term owners instead of activists agitating for returning more cash to shareholders.

One reason buybacks are common is that U.S. companies have earned so much money in the past few years. Over the previous 12 months they’ve generated $1.1 trillion in profits—a sum that “cannot possibly be reinvested back” as capital spending or research and development, says Dubravko Lakos-Bujas, an equity strategist at JPMorgan Chase. “Cash flow generation for U.S. companies has been very robust, balance sheets have remained pretty healthy, and interest rates are still low,” he says. “With growth fairly anemic, it’s extra reason for buybacks.” Or as BTIG’s Greenhaus puts it, “Companies have to do something with their cash.”

When dividends are included, companies are returning about as much cash to shareholders as they have in the past. Added together and expressed as a proportion of stock prices, repurchases and other payouts total 4.3 percent—about the historical average, according to JPMorgan data.

Investors have shown that they approve of the tactic. Shares of the 100 companies that use the biggest portion of their cash on repurchases in 2014 have beaten those that spent more on plants and equipment, according to an April study by Barclays. Says Marshall Front, chief investment officer at Front Barnett Associates: “Corporations wouldn’t buy back as much of their stock if they could make a significant increase in earnings over the years through investment.”

The bottom line: Companies spent more than $550 billion on their own stock in 2014, boosting earnings by 2.3 percentage points.

Braggin’ Rights – 2015 Sell List

 
SYMBOL TIME & PRICE CHG & % CHG DAY’S LOW & HIGH VOLUME AVG VOL MKT CAP CHART MORE INFO
ZAR.TO 09:45am EDT 2.18 -0.06 -2.68% 2.15 2.36 101,206 60,409 67.83M Sparkline Chart
BTO.TO 09:52am EDT 1.87 -0.06 -3.11% 1.87 1.90 223,796 2,516,350 1.73B Sparkline Chart Chart, News, Stats, Options, Board
LINE 10:08am EDT 8.91 -0.14 -1.49% 8.92 9.10 372,653 2,530,080 3.17B Sparkline Chart Chart, News, Stats, Options, Board
CVX 10:04am EDT 93.71 -1.06 -1.12% 93.74 94.51 1,597,993 6,739,090 176.65B Sparkline Chart Chart, News, Stats, Options, Board
AMZN 10:08am EDT 432.14 -3.90 -0.89% 433.39 437.38 212,149 3,003,510 201.92B Sparkline Chart Chart, News, Stats, Options, Board
CHK 10:08am EDT 10.05 -0.38 -3.60% 10.09 10.50 2,706,474 21,762,400 6.6988B Sparkline Chart Chart, News, Stats, Options, Board
DSX 10:08am EDT 7.18 -0.13 -1.78% 7.12 7.28 49,960 626,138 595.87M Sparkline Chart Chart, News, Stats, Options, Board
DRYS 10:03am EDT 0.5261 -0.0119 -2.21% 0.5231 0.55 443,358 3,560,790 360.0919M Sparkline Chart Chart, News, Stats, Options, Board
LL 10:03am EDT 20.30 -0.31 -1.50% 20.31 20.70 187,590 2,414,610 551.3908M Sparkline Chart Chart, News, Stats, Options, Board
FRO 10:08am EDT 2.3200 -0.1000 -4.13% 2.31 2.38 664,270 3,067,280 331.915M Sparkline Chart Chart, News, Stats, Options, Board
IMG.TO 09:48am EDT 2.40 -0.08 -3.23% 2.39 2.45 126,508 1,547,850 943.24M Sparkline Chart Chart, News, Stats, Options, Board
ONDK 10:07am EDT 11.76 -0.08 -0.69% 11.64 12.20 28,448 355,503 826.1916M Sparkline Chart Chart, News, Stats, Options, Board
PWT.TO 09:52am EDT 2.02 -0.06 -2.88% 2.01 2.08 106,701 1,909,760 1.01B Sparkline Chart Chart, News, Stats, Options, Board

My rant – the  curse of Cassandra :

Cassandra, daughter of the king and queen, in the temple of Apollo, exhausted from practising, is said to have fallen asleep – when Apollo wished to embrace her, she did not afford the opportunity of her body. On account of which thing :

when she prophesied true things, she was not believed.

I have written :

Managed Accounts Year End Review and Forecast ( click on title to review)

in part

Oil/ Energy

I am very happy for the call in natural gas prices – out at $12 and into oil. When oil was above $100 we lessened positions and that is our saving grace in the past two weeks. We are not bottom feeders and will wait for a turn in the market before reentering drillers or producers.

On Friday November 27th, crude oil prices dropped to below $72 and the slide has continued into the weekend, with Brent crude oil at $70.15 as I write this post. Shares of major oil companies traded down on Friday. Our former energy sector holdings are down another between 4% and 11%, including SDRL, which dropped another 8% following Wednesday’s 23% plunge..

Join in on the portfolio profits of Jack A. Bass Managed Accounts:

Fees : 1 % annual set up and a performance bonus of 20 % – only if we perform.

You can withdraw your funds monthly if you require an income stream.

Contact information:

To learn more about portfolio management ,asset protection, trusts ,offshore company formation and structure for your business interests (at no cost or obligation)

Email

jackabass@gmail.com OR

info@jackbassteam.com  OR

Call Jack direct at 604-858-3202

10:00 – 4:00 Monday to Friday Pacific Time ( same time zone as Los Angeles).

Similar to wise buying decisions, exiting certain underperformers at the right time helps maximize portfolio returns. Selling off losers can be difficult, but if both the share price and estimates are falling, it could be time to get rid of the security before more losses hit your portfolio.

Trading Alert : Leon Black’s Sell-Everything Call

Depression - an idea whose time has come back!

 

When financier Leon Black said his Apollo Global Management LLC was exiting “everything that’s not nailed down” amid rising valuations, he made headlines. Two years later, other private-equity firms are following suit — dumping stakes into the markets at a record clip.

Firms including Blackstone Group LP and TPG Capital Management have been capitalizing on record stock markets around the world to sell shares, mostly in their companies that have already gone public. Globally, buyout firms conducted 97 stock offerings in the second quarter, more than in any other three-month period, according to data compiled by Bloomberg.

Since Black made his comments in April 2013, the MSCI World Index has gained 18 percent, stretching valuations even higher. Headwinds that threaten to rattle global equities are everywhere — from the Greek and Puerto Rican debt crises to an eventual increase in U.S. interest rates.

“It’s clear that we are currently in an environment of frothy valuations,” said Lise Buyer, founder of IPO advisory firm Class V Group. “The insiders — those with the most knowledge — are finding this a very good time to take some money off the table.”

This year, private-equity firms sold $73 billion of their buyouts to the public, a record amount over a six month period, Bloomberg data show.

Hilton Deal

The biggest such deal this year came in May when Blackstone sold 90 million shares, or $2.69 billion worth, of hotel-chain Hilton Worldwide Holdings Inc. in a secondary offering. Blackstone took the company private in 2007 for $26 billion and did an IPO in December 2013, raising $2.7 billion. After the latest sale, Blackstone’s stake in Hilton fell to 46 percent from 82 percent before the IPO, Bloomberg data show.

The largest European exit so far this year was the $2.46 billion IPO of online car dealership Auto Trader Group Plc in London, where Apax Partners sold shares. In Asia, private-equity firm China Aerospace Investment Holdings Ltd. sold 2.3 million shares in a $2.12 billion IPO of China National Nuclear Power Co.

While the firms have been trimming their stakes in public companies, they’re doing fewer initial offerings in the U.S. PE-backed IPOs have had the slowest start to the year since 2010, selling $8.2 billion in stock.

The reason: Many of the larger companies that were swooped up during the buyout boom that ended in 2007 have already gone public. Today’s selling is largely private-equity owners getting out of those assets.

Fundraising Spree

“It’s been a lot more about harvesting public positions than creating new ones through IPOs,” said Cully Davis, co-head of equity capital markets for the Americas at Credit Suisse Group AG. “The markets are open and the financial sponsors are pretty astute about timing their exits.”

Buyout firms were also motivated to exit older positions as they seek investments for new funds, said Klaus Hessberger, co-head of equity capital markets for Europe, the Middle East and Africa at JPMorgan Chase & Co. The funds raised $438 billion last year, a post-crisis record, according to an April report by research firm Triago.

Selling to companies or other buyout shops was still the more popular way for private-equity firms to unload assets over the quarter. They sold $57 billion of assets in 284 sales in the second quarter, compared with $39 billion for stock sales, according to data compiled by Bloomberg.

In an echo of Leon Black, Frank Maturo, vice chairman of equity capital markets at UBS AG, said, “Private equity is selling everything that’s not bolted down. With the robust valuations in today’s market, they are accelerating monetizations of companies they own.”

Become The Keeper Of Your Own Future – Here’s Your Wealth Pathway

 

Thinking about taking action isn’t going to create wealth.

Reading this blog without taking action to create your International Business Corporation, using tax havens to reduce your tax burden – does not create wealth.

Government shutdowns, ridiculous breaches of privacy, massive debts…

All around, the news these days is bad. But I don’t need to remind you of that. You know as well as I the state of the world right now.

You also know you can’t rely on bungling politicians for help. What you may not realize is how to pull yourself out of this mess and take control of your own future.

How can you ensure that you and your family are ok, no matter what the rest of the world decides to do?

Become The Keeper Of Your Own Future

Not enough people realize this, but this is the key to establishing a secure financial future for you and your family.

This sounds like a simple change of mindset, but it’s not. We are all used to a lifetime of believing that the government is there to help, that no matter what happens, they’ll be there as a safety net.

In the 21st century, those days are over.

I can’t say it loudly enough: You are the one in the driver’s seat. You have the power to make the decisions that will shape your future, and that of your family.

And yes, it’s work. Managing your own destiny is harder than leaving it to others, but, when you recognize the consequences of not taking control of your own future, it’s a no-brainer. You’ve got to act. And you’ve got to act now.
This first critical step is really a personal commitment to yourself–a promise that you will take full responsibility for your own life.

I realize this can be a scary prospect. Some folks are so overwhelmed by this idea that they would rather leave things be.

In today’s world, nobody can afford to be dependent on any one economy…on any one government…or on any one currency.

The way to protect yourself is to diversify outside your home country’s borders. The reality of the world we’re living in is that this is the only effective strategy available to you…to me…to all of us.

It’s a simple insight. We all know about diversity when it comes to stocks and bonds. Yet few people realize the fundamental importance of taking this basic concept to the next level.

I’ve been in the room with educated, experienced investors, who’ve bragged of their diversified portfolios. They hold stocks, bonds, real estate…

But once I’ve probed a little deeper, I’ve often found that their portfolios all share one problem. All are “diversified” in U.S. dollars…their investments are all domiciled in the United States…and they’re all at the mercy of anyone’s lawsuit filed under the U.S. legal system, including suits after their retirement funds.

What happens to these “diversified” investors if the dollar radically declines in value?

What if an angry litigant attacks your assets with a frivolous lawsuit?

1) CONTACT Jack A. Bass and set up your corporation offshore.

2) Open a bank account offshore

3) open a trading account offshore

4) accumulate your wealth in a low tax jurisdiction.

To START –

email info@jackbassteam.com or

call Jack direct at 604-858-3202 ( no cost or obligation).

 

3 Stocks That Big Investors Like /Are Buying

When investment pros such as Warren Buffett, George Soros and Leon Coopermanput their money behind a company, it’s worth noting — especially when they do it together.

Of course, Wall Street’s best and brightest aren’t always in agreement, and when they’re not, things can get pretty heated. Take, for example, Bill Ackman and Carl Icahn‘s epic showdown overHerbalife (HLF) or Dan Loeb’s sharp criticism of Warren Buffett.

Warren Buffett picked up a stake in 21st Century Fox (FOXA) in late 2014, and in 2015, he has continued to increase his position and now owns over 6.2 million shares.

During the first quarter of the year, Leon Cooperman joined the Oracle of Omaha in betting on FOXA with the purchase of 2.6 million shares, and Chase Coleman’s Tiger Global maintained its position of 16.8 million shares.

On June 11, news broke that Rupert Murdoch is preparing to step down as CEO of 21st Century Fox and hand over the reins to his sons, James and Lachlan. The company confirmed Tuesday that James will succeed his father as chief executive.

One interesting fact about how Murdoch’s exit will affect Buffett: Once Murdoch steps down, Buffett will increase his lead as the oldest CEO in the S&P 500

Adreas Halvorsen’s biggest new buy of the first quarter of 2015 was AIG (AIG – Get Report), of which he picked up 8.4 million shares valued at upwards of $460 million. Fellow hedge funder John Paulson picked up an even bigger stake in the insurance company, purchasing 14.6 million shares. Larry Robbins increased his position to 6.5 million shares, and Dan Loeb left his holdings untouched at 3.5 million shares.

In other words, AIG is pretty popular among Wall Street pros.
AIG made headlines Monday when a federal judge ruled that the U.S. acted beyond the bounds of its authority in its 2008 bailout of the company; however, the judge did not award any damages to former AIG chief executive, Hank Greenberg, who sought to win at least $25 billion for shareholders.

Through market close Wednesday, AIG’s stock has climbed more than 10% year-to-date.

The cheaper Chesapeake Energy (CHKGet Report) becomes, the more Carl Icahn buys — or that’s at least how it seems. The vociferous billionaire investor raised eyebrows in March when a regulatory filing revealed he had increased his stake in the energy company. He owns more than 73 million CHK shares, giving him an 11% stake.

Ray Dalio’s Bridgewater Associates also upped the ante in Chesapeake Energy this year. In the first quarter, the fund nearly doubled its position. It owns about 450,000 of the company’s shares.

Chesapeake, a producer of natural gas, oil and natural gas liquids, has been hit hard by falling oil prices. Through market close Wednesday, its stock has declined 60% over the past year, including about 38% in 2015 alone.

Analysts at Oppenheimer downgraded the stock to perform from outperform on June 11. “Based on the future strip benchmark oil and gas prices, we expect CHK to report losses of $544M this year and $833M next year, or $0.58 per share and $0.84 per share, respectively,” the firm said in an analyst note.

Stocks To Avoid : Chesapeake Our Top Avoid In Natural Gas,

occupy wall street cartoon

 

These are this Thursday’s top analyst upgrades, downgrades and initiations.

Check out Seeking Alpha for the unending series of article seeking  to pick the bottom – in natural gas, shipping , drilling and compare that to our consistent  AVOID ratings:

Chesapeake Energy Corp. (NYSE: CHK) was downgraded to Perform from Outperform at Oppenheimer. That means that the firm now has no target to speak of, and the $13.06 closing price compares to a consensus price target of $15.67 and a 52-week range of $12.89 to $29.92. The downgrade was based on growing losses and a cash flow deficit.

Rite Aid Corp. (NYSE: RAD) was started as Outperform with a $10 price target (versus a $8.64 close) at Credit Suisse. The firm believes Rite Aid is one of the more compelling risk-reward profiles in the space and that it has a compelling M&A potential.

Toll Brothers Inc. (NYSE: TOL) was raised to Outperform from Neutral and the target price was raised to $42 from $40 (versus a $36.81 close) at Credit Suisse. The firm believes that investors underappreciate its earnings potential, and the firm raised estimates to reflect the updated City Living pipeline.

Transocean Ltd. (NYSE: RIG) was started as Underweight with a price target of $14 (versus a $19.08 close) at Barclays. Transocean’s consensus price target is $14.17, and the 52-week range is $13.28 to $46.12.

Harley-Davidson Inc. (NYSE: HOG) was downgraded to Neutral from Outperform with a price target cut to $57.00 from $74.00 (versus a $54.69 close) at Wedbush. Harley-Davidson has a consensus price target of $66.00 and a 52-week range of $53.04 to $72.37.